Life Sciences Webinar on Protein Modifications: Role of Phosphorylation in Suervival and Virulence of Pathogenic Bacteria | Shiv Nadar University
Enquire Now
Apply Now
Undergraduate AdmissionsUndergraduate Information SessionInternational AdmissionsM.Tech / PG ProgramsPhD Admission Monsoon 2022MBA Degree ProgramMBA (Executive) AdmissionsMBA (Online) AdmissionsData Sciences and Analytics for Business (DSAB)

Life Sciences Webinar on Protein Modifications: Role of Phosphorylation in Suervival and Virulence of Pathogenic Bacteria

Event Date: 
Wednesday, March 2, 2022 -
15:0016:00

The Department of Life Sciences conducted a seminar titled 'Protein Modifications: Role of Phosphorylation in Suervival and Virulence of Pathogenic Bacteria' by Dr. Yogendra Singh, Professor, University of Delhi, Delhi on March 2, 2022, from 3 PM to 4 PM.

Abstract
Post-translational modifications are essential mechanisms used by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to diversify their protein functions. In living cells, hundreds of protein modifications have been identified such as phosphorylation, methylation, acetylation, ADP-ribosylation and glycosylation etc.  Protein phosphorylation is known to be the most common modifications which regulates multiple cellular processes such as cell division, metabolic pathways, stress response, sporulation and virulence in pathogens. The master players of these events are kinases and phosphatases that are often reported as essential for the survival and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Earlier, we showed that a secretory tyrosine phosphatase (MptpB) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential for infection and the mutant strain lacking MptpB was about hundred-fold less virulent.  We also demonstrated the critical role of a lone serine/threonine phosphatase, PstP in the survival and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.  In another spore forming pathogenic bacterium, Bacillus anthracis, we showed the role of protein ser/thr kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of bacterial chain length and toxin synthesis that are imperative for bacterial pathogenesis. Recently, we characterized a novel serine/threonine phosphatase, PrpN in Bacillus anthracis and observed that it regulates sporulation and toxins production via dephosphorylation of a global transcriptional regulator. In brief, we have conclusively shown the importance of kinases and phosphatases in multiple cellular processes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus anthracis associated with virulence and survival. These studies can thus provide a base for designing and evaluating novel drug targets and vaccine candidates for tuberculosis and anthrax.

Wednesday 02, Mar 2022
03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

D-330

Directions