Archaeology Talk: Gardens of the Coromandel Coast: Landscape Considerations of Commercial Agriculture in an 18th Century Colonial Enclave | Shiv Nadar University
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Archaeology Talk: Gardens of the Coromandel Coast: Landscape Considerations of Commercial Agriculture in an 18th Century Colonial Enclave

Event Date: 
Thursday, October 28, 2021 -
19:0020:30

The Center for Archaeology, Heritage and Museums Studies invites you to a virtual talk titled ‘Gardens of the Coromandel Coast: Landscape Considerations of Commercial Agriculture in an 18th Century Colonial Enclave’ by Dr. Mark W. Hauser, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, on 28 October 2021 at 7:00 PM.

About the Talk
The plantation as a socio-ecological form has become a shorthand for the modern world and has focused on numerous landscape studies in the Atlantic world. By extending the archaeological practice of such commercial settlements to south India, we see the multiple roots through which commercial agriculture and rural industry enabled the modern world.  This paper reports on results from the first phase of the Colonial Tharangambadi Archaeological Survey (CTAS)- a project designed to compare and connect the Indian and Atlantic oceans through the lens of South Indian and Caribbean early modern landscapes.  The goal of CTAS was to document changing settlement patterns, settlement organization, and material assemblage between the 17th and 19th centuries through a systematic survey in the former Danish colonial enclave, Tranquebar (Tharangambadi). Specifically, we documented one settlement formation devoted to commercial agriculture, called gardens, which has origins in medieval South India, and how they became used outside the town's walls in the 18th and 19th centuries. We argue that from historically distinctive agrarian facilities geared to commercial production, plantation-like rural industries developed quite broadly using vulnerable labor to produce plant commodities in high volume for international markets. The particularities of plantations in the Atlantic world are enriched by comparisons to parallel development under similar conditions, as illustrated by India's lesser-known Danish colony.

About the Speaker
Dr. Mark W. Hauser is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Chicago, USA. He is a historical archaeologist specializing in the studies of materiality, slavery and inequality in the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. 

Thursday 28, Oct 2021
07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

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